trexstudiosart:

Big part of my final project is studies of the animals I’m drawing. So Ive been doing a lot of them and thinking about the way they interacted and lived as well. Here are a few sketches of a 2 yr old rex in various poses. And a 12 year old rex which was interesting to see since in the three age groups I have 2, 12 and 17 this is the middle. But what Ive see is that there is a much different and more drastic change in the age gap of 12 to 17 then in the gap of 2 to 12 which astounds me.

Also researching the idea that Tyrannosaurus rex lived in a matriarchal society like Elephants. The females lived in family groups perhaps with all their generations to keep young safe, while males (similar to elephants) lived on their own only appearing to mate or to fight with other males over territory. Granted I doubt a group of tyrannosaurus would be as large as a herd of elephants since each rex would need food. And there would be a difference in sharing food from a kill compared to elephants where they have various sorces of vegetation to share amongst each other. I bet feeding would be similar to lions where the oldest would have first pickings.

21

oktober

26 notities

This photo was reblogged from capricornis-swinhoei and originally by trexstudiosart.

"The absence of evidence is not the evidence of absence."

-

Carl Sagan, Cosmos (via reddit user sclow15)

Check out the #asapbookclub subreddit for discussion of our latest book club book, the above. 

(via asapscience)

21

oktober

375 notities

This quote was reblogged from asapscience and originally by asapscience.

Our Lady of Alpha Particles

adventuresinchemistry:

Irene Joliot-Curie (1897 – 1956) 

 image

Physics and Chemistry

The daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie, Irene Joliot-Curie is a notable scientist in her own right, winning a Nobel Prize in Chemistry with her husband, Frédéric Joliot-Curie, in 1935 for the discovery of artificial radioactivity, making the Curie family the most Nobeled family in history and a significant scientific dynasty.

Read More

21

oktober

132 notities

This text was reblogged from adventuresinchemistry and originally by adventuresinchemistry.

ronaldhope:

Mt. Rainier wilderness at night
Photo by: www.ronaldhope.tumblr.com

ronaldhope:

Mt. Rainier wilderness at night

Photo by: www.ronaldhope.tumblr.com

21

oktober

213 notities

This photo was reblogged from fuckyeah-stars and originally by ronaldhope.

(Bron: artizan3)

21

oktober

176 notities

This photo was reblogged from mugwumpped and originally by artizan3.

the-science-llama:

So I saw some gifs and decided to fix them.

21

oktober

38.927 notities

This photo was reblogged from neurocybernetics and originally by the-science-llama.

#reblog #pessimism through gifs #<3 #you're welcome

sagansense:

endeavor&#160;: an attempt to achieve a goal; earnest and industrious effort, especially when sustained over a period of time; an enterprise or undertaking

I’d like to welcome everybody and provide an introduction. 

Right now, the year is 2014. Up until this moment throughout ‘modern’ civilization, we’ve struggled amongst society to penetrate through the economic discourse of our own devices and fuel innovation by actively participating in it ourselves alongside those working on the frontiers of our ignorance.

Citizen science is essentially rebranded or evolved activism, and it’s come a long way since the advent of the globally-connected wireless force of influence we call ‘the internet’. We’ve watched online activism take shape, assemble, and thrive in real-time on Twitter during Arab Spring. Just as quickly, we’ve watched viral smear campaigns become snuffed out just as fast as they’ve begun. Human society has entered an age where information - even the wrong kind - can spread, infiltrating homes and mobile devices, plaguing scientifically illiterate minds and confusing the masses regarding reality and the way society even functions.



However, just as in biological or cosmological evolution, entropy, when properly recognized, can be guided in a way where the outcome is beneficial for all. Carl Sagan once asserted, “if you wait long enough, everything changes;" which brings me to the present moment. We’re hungry for information, thirsty for the truth, and starving for transparency in an age where we so desperately need it the most amidst a growing population where new minds and voices are coming online every day.

One of us knows at least someone - other than ourselves - that have aided in scientific research, or attempted, at least. From charity baskets, door-to-door donations, online/sidewalk fundraising campaigns, walks/runs and triathlons for illnesses or disorders, we all have an innate desire to help our fellow brothers and sisters. 

Aid. Cures. Progress. None of it happens without the research to propel it forward. 

We all know that we want to assist in solving problems. And realistically, we understand that they won’t be solved today. Or tomorrow. But someday. And having the peace of mind that we supported this/that effort in someway, provides us hope in humanity and strengthens our resolve to remain confident regarding a future we realize may be beyond our time.

Now, there’s a network which embodies human curiosity and ingenuity never before put forward. It’s called Endeavorist.



 From biochemistry to astrophysics, Endeavorist provides a platform for researchers to put their work in progress on display, communicate its importance, and launch a ‘Research Campaign' to have it funded. Adversely, 'Grants' and 'Grant Campaigns' - features unique to Endeavorist - drive innovation by the public at large (or another researcher) by essentially placing a bounty on the research either not yet explored, or which hasn’t been given the attention or support you feel it deserves and you’d like to see flourish.

Endeavorist is the world’s first curiosity network, meaning, it belongs to the world. We’ve long been held back by bureaucratic, commercial, industrial, and often institutionalized interests that scarcely reflect the passions of the researchers themselves. We’re overdue for an upgrade on how we connect the science of tomorrow with the researchers of today. 

I invite you all to discover Endeavorist, because it’s what we’ve deserved all along. This is a small step for citizen science, but a giant leap for the advancement of scientific research.

#freescience

sagansense:

endeavor : an attempt to achieve a goal; earnest and industrious effort, especially when sustained over a period of time; an enterprise or undertaking

I’d like to welcome everybody and provide an introduction.

Right now, the year is 2014. Up until this moment throughout ‘modern’ civilization, we’ve struggled amongst society to penetrate through the economic discourse of our own devices and fuel innovation by actively participating in it ourselves alongside those working on the frontiers of our ignorance.

Citizen science is essentially rebranded or evolved activism, and it’s come a long way since the advent of the globally-connected wireless force of influence we call ‘the internet’. We’ve watched online activism take shape, assemble, and thrive in real-time on Twitter during Arab Spring. Just as quickly, we’ve watched viral smear campaigns become snuffed out just as fast as they’ve begun. Human society has entered an age where information - even the wrong kind - can spread, infiltrating homes and mobile devices, plaguing scientifically illiterate minds and confusing the masses regarding reality and the way society even functions.

However, just as in biological or cosmological evolution, entropy, when properly recognized, can be guided in a way where the outcome is beneficial for all. Carl Sagan once asserted, “if you wait long enough, everything changes;" which brings me to the present moment. We’re hungry for information, thirsty for the truth, and starving for transparency in an age where we so desperately need it the most amidst a growing population where new minds and voices are coming online every day.

One of us knows at least someone - other than ourselves - that have aided in scientific research, or attempted, at least. From charity baskets, door-to-door donations, online/sidewalk fundraising campaigns, walks/runs and triathlons for illnesses or disorders, we all have an innate desire to help our fellow brothers and sisters.

Aid. Cures. Progress. None of it happens without the research to propel it forward.

We all know that we want to assist in solving problems. And realistically, we understand that they won’t be solved today. Or tomorrow. But someday. And having the peace of mind that we supported this/that effort in someway, provides us hope in humanity and strengthens our resolve to remain confident regarding a future we realize may be beyond our time.

Now, there’s a network which embodies human curiosity and ingenuity never before put forward. It’s called Endeavorist.

From biochemistry to astrophysics, Endeavorist provides a platform for researchers to put their work in progress on display, communicate its importance, and launch a ‘Research Campaign' to have it funded. Adversely, 'Grants' and 'Grant Campaigns' - features unique to Endeavorist - drive innovation by the public at large (or another researcher) by essentially placing a bounty on the research either not yet explored, or which hasn’t been given the attention or support you feel it deserves and you’d like to see flourish.

Endeavorist is the world’s first curiosity network, meaning, it belongs to the world. We’ve long been held back by bureaucratic, commercial, industrial, and often institutionalized interests that scarcely reflect the passions of the researchers themselves. We’re overdue for an upgrade on how we connect the science of tomorrow with the researchers of today.

I invite you all to discover Endeavorist, because it’s what we’ve deserved all along. This is a small step for citizen science, but a giant leap for the advancement of scientific research.

#freescience

21

oktober

49 notities

This photo was reblogged from sagansense and originally by sagansense.

smoke-thc-drop-lsd:

alluringabyss:

Burmese Tourmaline 8.15 ct

DAMN

smoke-thc-drop-lsd:

alluringabyss:

Burmese Tourmaline 8.15 ct

DAMN

21

oktober

6.083 notities

This photo was reblogged from neuro-genesis and originally by alluringabyss.

spaceexp:

Docking the last Automated Transfer Vehicle

21

oktober

49 notities

This video was reblogged from spaceexp and originally by spaceexp.

malformalady:

Jellyfish bloom

malformalady:

Jellyfish bloom

21

oktober

2.247 notities

This photo was reblogged from annieskywalker and originally by malformalady.

oszt:

       iraffiruse:

Long exposure, 3 traffic lights in the fog.

damn this justthis fukn does it for methis is gorgeous

oszt:

       iraffiruse:

Long exposure, 3 traffic lights in the fog.

damn this just
this fukn does it for me
this is gorgeous

21

oktober

472.502 notities

This photo was reblogged from neurocybernetics and originally by iraffiruse.

spacettf:

magical atmosphere by wildlifemoments on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Milky way outside the Cala luna cave, Dorgali, Sardinia. Beautiful scenery for nightscapes, magical atmosphere.

spacettf:

magical atmosphere by wildlifemoments on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Milky way outside the Cala luna cave, Dorgali, Sardinia. Beautiful scenery for nightscapes, magical atmosphere.

21

oktober

218 notities

This photo was reblogged from fuckyeah-stars and originally by spacettf.

transdimensionalboundaries:

dirtybetanerd:

kedreeva:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.

A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!

Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.

All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.

Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

Let me tell to you a thing.

This is Lenore. I first saw her in a little cage at the Petco I frequent (I used to take my parents’ dog in for puppy play time), and she looked like the grouchiest, old, crotchety cat in the world, and I fell instantly in love. She was cranky, she was anti-social, hanging out at the back of her cage. Her fur was matted because she wouldn’t let the groomers near her.

She was perfect.

But I didn’t have a place for her. I wasn’t living in my own space yet, and where I was, I wasn’t allowed cats. So I pressed my face to the bars of her cage and I promised that if no one had adopted her by the time I’d bought a house, I would come back for her.

I visited her every week for over six months while I looked for a house. At one point, they had to just shave her entire rear-end because the mats or fur were so bad. They told me she clawed the heck outta the groomer that did it, screamed the entire time, and spent the next two days growling at anyone that came near the cage.

A couple of weeks later, I closed on my house. I went back and I got an employee, and I said: “That one. I need that cat.”

They got the paperwork and the lady who ran the rescue that was bringing the cats in told me that Lenore (at the time, Lila) was 8 years old, had been owned by an elderly lady who had died, and brought in to a different rescue, who’d had her for six months on top of the time I’d been seeing her at Petco.

This kitty had been living in a 3x3’ cube for over a YEAR because she was older and “less adoptable.”

I signed the paperwork, put her in a cat carrier, and drove her to my new home. I had pretty much nothing; a bed, an old couch, a couple of bookcases, and a tank of mice I called “Cat TV”. I let her out of the carrier and onto my bed, and I told her “I told you I would come back for you when I had a place. It’s not much, but it’s yours too now.”

Lenore spent the next three days straight purring non-stop. She followed me around the house purring. Sat next to me purring. Slept next to me purring. Leaning into every touch, purring, purring, always purring. She still purrs if you so much as think about petting her. She’s amazing, and I love her.

So, you know, if you’re thinking about adopting, and you see a beast that others consider “less adoptable,” think about Lenore.

FUCKING IMPORTANT

The STORY THOUGH.

21

oktober

438.784 notities

This photo was reblogged from keyflailing and originally by 8bitrevolver.

ageofdestruction:

spectrum: The Sun, photographed by Solar Dynamics Observatory, 28th August 2014.

10 frames; each frame is a composite of 3 images in different wavelengths. Here, I have used 3 wavelengths in the extreme UV range (17.1, 19.3, and 21.1 nm), for the blue, green, and red channels which usually represent visible light of about 475, 530, and 680 nm, respectively.

Sequence covers about 11 hours.

Image credit: NASA/SDO, AIA/EVE/HMI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

21

oktober

3.344 notities

This photo was reblogged from astro-stoner and originally by ageofdestruction.

bbsrc:

21

oktober

343 notities

This photo was reblogged from brainsx and originally by bbsrc.

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